Colour in context – pale gold

Colour in context – pale gold

From textiles to tiles, stone to panelling, colour plays an integral role within any design project. As such, each month Surfacing has invited the trend forecasting company behind Mix Publications, Global Color Research, to talk about a key colour for the current season. Although the company forecasts colour trends two years ahead of the season, this series of articles will focus on a colour of the month, taken from the Mix Trends forecast. Hannah Malein presents May’s colour, pale gold ...

Sitting within an unexpectedly glamorous scheme, pale gold is embellished with raw earth hues for a new take on natural in the spring/ summer 2013 story, Precious. In response to our diminishing materials we seek out untapped resources or unusual reserves to create new avenues to design with. We look to the history and age of resources, where beautiful materials developed over millions of years to inspire layering and compressed surfaces made up of found, and previously redundant materials. Natural stone, rock and ore are key as we take a more elemental approach to design.

In a palette inspired by archaeological finds, precious metals and minerals are dug up to reveal a hoard of rich discoveries. Metallic shades have interference or embedded colour that reflect the changing nature of earth’s raw ingredients. Natural ore and mineral shades are inspired by natural pigments; here we find gold in a pale metallic finish, paired with rich umber brown and mustard yellow tones. This combination adds a glamour ideal, whilst a highlight of vibrant green introduces a refreshing brightness to the heavier tones.

The colour gold represents success and achievement, and by it’s very nature denotes physical wealth. Associated with prosperity and luxury, it symbolises high quality, however it can be seen as over extravagant and tacky if used in a brighter tone. For a more subtle approach, use this paler tone of gold to bring a sophisticated richness and warmth to a palette. 

Mineral textures influence raw ceramic surfaces with grainy organic glazes, and irregular patterns found in crystal and rock formations bring interest to trimmings. Embedded reflective particles in solid surfaces and subtle metallic threads in linens and shot silks bring an added sparkle to the trend.

Try pairing May’s colour pale gold with mustard, brown and a touch of vibrant green for a new take on golden glamour. For the full colour story and ideas for its application, see a full presentation of the Precious trend in Mix Trends spring / summer 2013 issue 24.

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